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06/25/2014

New Study on Federal Student Aid

Washington, DC — New research from the Center for College Affordability and Productivity (CCAP) analyzes and assesses the current federal student assistance programs.  “Dollars, Cents and Nonsense: The Harmful Effects of Federal Student Aid” by Richard Vedder, Christopher Denhart, and Joseph Hartge concludes eight fundamental flaws with the system as it stands, including pointing out that the rise in federal aid has in turn led to a rise in College Tuition.  The report tracks growth in assistance programs over time using The College Board’s “Trends in Higher Education” data. 

08/18/2011

 New Study on Educational Inequality

Washington, DC – New research from the Center for College Affordability and Productivity (CCAP) utilizes educational attainment data to develop historical measures of inequality in the distribution of education in the United States. The analysis examines this educational inequality by age group and sex between 1950 and 2009. This paper also provides an overview of the possible research extensions of the new data, including new tools for evaluating education policy and for analyzing the effect that education has on the distribution of income and economic growth.

03/21/2011

Stop Misusing Higher Education-Specific Price Indices

Washington, DC – The Center for College Affordability and Productivity is pleased to announce the release of Stop Misusing Higher Education Specific Price Indices. The study examines two commonly used higher education price indices, the Higher Education Price Index (HEPI) and the Higher Education Cost Adjustment (HECA), finding that these are almost always misused and suffer from significant bias. These indices are often used to discount tuition levels. This is inappropriate. The whole point of using a price index in this instance is to put otherwise incomparable values into the same context, something that an industry specific price index does not allow.

03/16/2011

How College Pricing Undermines Financial Aid

Washington, DC –The Center for College Affordability and Productivity is pleased to announce the release of How College Pricing Undermines Financial Aid, by Robert E. Martin and Andrew Gillen. Analyzing college pricing decisions, this study explains how college pricing renders most financial aid programs ineffective as a tool for increasing college affordability. Despite vast increases in financial aid over the years, the cost of attending college has continued to soar. The main finding is that colleges often deliberately raise their prices when aid is available, in essence “capturing” the aid.

01/31/2011

Funding the Arms Race: A Case Study of Student Athletics Fees

Washington, DC – A new study from the Center for College Affordability and Productivity (CCAP), to be released Monday, January 31, 2011, reveals that growing fees used to subsidize intercollegiate athletics may not have the support of the students who pay them. Surveying nearly 1,000 students at Ohio University, a fairly typical state university, the study suggests that students are largely ignorant and hostile to athletic fees.

12/16/2010

From Wall Street to Wal-Mart: Why College Graduates Are Not Getting Good Jobs

Washington, DC – A new study by The Center for College Affordability and Productivity (CCAP), From Wall Street to Wal-Mart: Why College Graduates are not Getting Good Jobs, reveals that colleges and universities are turning out graduates faster than America’s labor markets are creating jobs that require college degrees. The report finds that in 2008, 34% of all employed college graduates were filling below college-level jobs. For example, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 17.5% of office clerks, 17.4% of baggage porters/bellhops and 15.2% of taxi drivers had at least a bachelor’s degree in that year.

12/1/2010

25 Ways to Reduce the Cost of College: Part 4

Washington, DC –The Center for College Affordability and Productivity (CCAP), with generous support from Lumina Foundation, is pleased to announce the release of “Exploit Technology,” the fourth section of 25 Ways to Reduce the Cost of College.

11/24/2010

25 Ways to Reduce the Cost of College: Part 3

Washington, DC –The Center for College Affordability and Productivity (CCAP), with generous support from Lumina Foundation, is pleased to announce the release of “Efficiently Use Resources,” the third section of 25 Ways to Reduce the Cost of College.

11/17/2010

25 Ways to Reduce the Cost of College: Part 2

Washington, DC –The Center for College Affordability and Productivity (CCAP), with generous support from Lumina Foundation, is pleased to announce the release of “Use Fewer Resources,” the second section of 25 Ways to Reduce the Cost of College.

11/10/2010

25 Ways to Reduce the Cost of College: Part 1

Washington, DC –The Center for College Affordability and Productivity, with generous support from Lumina Foundation, is pleased to announce the release of 25 Ways to Reduce the Cost of College. This book-length study offers a detailed analysis of 25 approaches university administrators and public policy leaders can take to reduce the burden of exploding college costs. The study groups the 25 different ideas for lowering the costs of college into five different topical sections, with each section featuring several chapters analyzing related topics. Each week, beginning November 10, 2010, one of the sections will be made publicly available accompanied by a press release.

10/20/2010

New Study on Higher Education Accreditation Education

Washington, DC –The Center for College Affordability and Productivity, with generous support from Lumina Foundation, is pleased to announce the release of its latest study: The Inmates Running the Asylum? An Analysis of Higher Education Accreditation, on Wednesday, October 20, 2010. This study provides an in-depth analysis of the role that the accreditation process plays in American higher education.

07/12/2010

New Study on For-Profit Higher Education

Washington, DC – A new report from The Center for College Affordability and Productivity (CCAP), with generous support from Lumina Foundation, provides an in-depth examination of the for-profit higher education industry in the U.S. The report includes an “insider’s view” of the industry, gained from talking to leaders of for-profit firms about what distinguishes their industry from traditional higher education, as well as the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead.

06/01/2010

New Research on Intercollegiate Athletics Funding

Washington, DC- A new paper by The Center for College Affordability and Productivity (CCAP), Intercollegiate Athletics Subsidies: a Regressive Tax, reveals that funding for intercollegiate athletics (ICA) is often diverted from traditional academic purposes, in effect imposing a tax on students to subsidize sports. CCAP’s analysis indicates that this tax is highly regressive and unequal in nature, with the relatively poor institutions and students bearing more of the cost burden for ICA than the rich.

02/03/2010

Richard Vedder to Participate in National Debate

Washington, DC- Dr. Richard Vedder will participate in a debate February 26, 2010 to be nationally televised on PBS. The debaters will be asked: Does the United States need more college graduates to remain an economic power, or is college just too expensive to benefit many Americans? The other debaters include George Leef, Margaret Spellings and Michael Lomax.

04/15/2009

New Study Identifies Major Flaw in Financial Aid Programs

Washington, DC- The Center for College Affordability and Productivity (CCAP) has released a new study critical of current financial aid policies, Financial Aid in Theory and Practice: Why It Is Ineffective and What Can Be Done About It.  The analysis finds that “policy makers have designed a convoluted financial aid system that inadvertently leads to higher tuition,” and that “many programs are ineffective and possibly counterproductive.”  The findings hinge on the recognition that many financial aid programs contribute to the academic arms race, fueling the explosion in costs, which in turn have a negative impact on college affordability and access.

04/14/2009

Study Explores the History and Implications of College Rankings

Washington, DC- The Center for College Affordability is pleased to release its latest study, College Rankings: History, Criticism and Reform. It identifies the historical factors behind the growing obsession with college rankings, explores both the positive and negative effects of college rankings and offers suggestions for improvement.

11/10/2008

CCAP Releases Net Tuition Figures

Washington, DC- While everyone knows that the “sticker price” of college has been going up every year, some are not alarmed because they argue that the net price to students is much lower due to financial aid.  This annual report uses Department of Education data to find the average net tuition from the 2000-2001 school year  through the 2005-2006 school year.  The findings, which show that net tuition has increased, depending on the type of school, anywhere from 11% to 73% over the last six years (after adjusting for inflation), has shocking implications for college affordability.

11/8/2008

New Study Links Tuition Inflation to Ban on Employer Testing

Washington, DC- Duke v. Griggs: Implications for College Credentialing investigates the higher education implications of the landmark 1971 Supreme Court decision that banned discriminatory job-related testing, unless it was a “business necessity”. The study concludes that the Court’s decision may have inadvertently pushed employers to begin using the college degree, in lieu of testing, to sort prospective employees and may be partially responsible for soaring college enrollment, tuition, and income inequality between college and high school graduates.